Kamieniec Ząbkowicki – a palace with a park
Wybierz obiekt:

Kamieniec Ząbkowicki – a palace with a park

The impressive palace in Kamieniec Ząbkowicki, often referred to as the gem of neo-Gothic architecture, and the beautiful 120-ha park, were established in the 19th century on the initiative of Princess Marianne of the Netherlands. It combines elements of late English Gothic, medieval Teutonic strongholds, and Sicilian and Moorish buildings. The palace was designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel. After his death, the executor was his partner, Ferdynand Martius.

At the time of its creation, the palace made an unforgettable impression both from the outside and from the inside. It was constructed on a rectangular plan (75 x 48 metres) and surrounded with an over-400-metre wall with four 34-metre towers. It was made of carefully cut stone and glazed brick, which preserved its shine until this day. Materials such as marbles, precious wood and beautiful tiles were used in the finishing of the interiors. Valuable items from the Hohenzollerns’ collections were also used.

The park was also far from ordinary: it contained marvellous terraces, fountains, ponds, pergolas, romantic caves and a mausoleum.

Since the palace was so immense and required large quantities of building material, a brickyard was established nearby. The marbles came from Princess Marianne of the Netherlands’s quarries in Stronie Śląskie and Kletno.

In 1873, the building passed into the hands of the founder’s son, Albrecht von Hohenzollern, and his wife – Maria von Sachsen Altenburg. The Hohenzollern family remained the owners of the palace until 1940, when it was taken over by Waldemar Pruski. During World War II, the Germans stored works of art taken from Silesian locations threatened by bombings in the palace (almost all of them had been sent to Germany before the palace was taken over by the Russians). Most of the surviving equipment was taken away by the Soviet army. In 1945, the Red Army set fire to the building causing substantial damage. Elements of the interior decor which were saved from the fire were moved by the Communist authorities to, among other locations, the Palace of Culture and Science, while some other elements were looted. The palace began to fall into disrepair. From 1988, when it was leased by Włodzimierz Sobiech, it was gradually renovated, but since the tenant’s death in 2010 it has been abandoned. The site is now managed by the commune of Kamieniec Ząbkowicki. The palace is in good condition, but requires a substantial financial contribution. About 100 rooms are now empty, and the palace park is not cultivated. It still contains much of the old tree stand, as well as fragments of sculptures, columns and fountains.

 

Contact:

No contact available.

 

How to get there:

Kamieniec Ząbkowicki is situated in the ząbkowicki district, about 80 km from Wrocław and about 10 km from Ząbkowice Śląskie.

Road no. 8 from Wrocław to Ząbkowice Śląskie, then road 382 in the direction of Kamieniec Ząbkowicki.

 

Visiting:

At present, the interiors of the palace are not available to visitors.

 

Fixed and regular events taking place on the site:

None.

 

Car parking:

Parking is possible in the vicinity of the site, and a paid car park is situated in front of the castle.

 

Places to eat:

Noclegi i Restauracja „Pod Wieżą”

ul. Ząbkowicka 9, 57-230 Kamieniec Ząbkowicki

tel./fax 74 817-36-95

There is no e-mail address available.

 

Accommodation:

Ośrodek Wypoczynkowo-Rekreacyjny „Tęcza”

ul. Zamkowa 4a, 57-230 Kamieniec Ząbkowicki

tel. 74 817-42-00, fax 74 817-36-00

There is no website available

e-mail: owr_kamieniec@op.pl

 

Agroturystyka „Dziupla”

Śrem 10, 57-230 Kamieniec Ząbkowicki

tel. 74 817-01-27 (po 18.00), 603-370-338

www.dziupla.dl.pl

e-mail: dziuplasrem@tlen.pl

 

Tourist information office:

Powiatowe Centrum Informacji Turystycznej

ul. św. Wojciecha 5/1, 57-200 Ząbkowice Śl.

tel. 74 815-74-01

www.ziemiazabkowicka.pl

e-mail: promocja@zabkowice-powiat.pl

Opening hours: Monday - Friday 8.30 a.m.- 3.30 p.m., Saturday 10.00 a.m. - 2.00 p.m.; (V-IX) Sunday 10.00 a.m. - 2.00 p.m.